Hot!Tech Questions Answered

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Mike Wilkerson
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2019/10/29 12:53:20 (permalink)

Tech Questions Answered

I'd like to get a comprehensive list of threads going here. The idea would be to send me the tech questions you have and we'll provide an answer in a usable form which other Bacchetta owners can use in the future. This can be anywhere from Bacchetta specific items to latest cutting edge items like E-assist, electronic shifting, etc. (we won't have the answer to all of these, but we probably know someone who does!).
 
So if you have tech questions, post them here and we'll see about getting this started!
 
Mike Wilkerson
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    Doc Dan
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    Re: Tech Questions Answered 2019/11/14 19:17:49 (permalink)
    What is the difference between a 650b and 650c tire?  I'm interested in the Panaracer Palesa 28mm tire but it only comes in a 650c.  Would I run into a problem with my Ti Aero or CA3?
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    tojesky
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    Re: Tech Questions Answered 2019/11/15 09:05:37 (permalink)
    650b is an ISO 584 whereas the 650c is ISO 571.  They are not interchangeable.
     
    Doc Dan
    What is the difference between a 650b and 650c tire?  I'm interested in the Panaracer Palesa 28mm tire but it only comes in a 650c.  Would I run into a problem with my Ti Aero or CA3?




     

    2013 CA2.0 - 700c
    2014 ICE VTX+
    2013 Invacare Force G hand cycle
    2006 Corsa  (Sold July, 2013)
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    Doc Dan
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    Re: Tech Questions Answered 2019/11/16 06:43:13 (permalink)
    I attempted some `self help' when it came to understanding what `ISO 584 v ISO 571' means and I came up with this: https://cyclocamping.com/blog/2015/08/01/what-do-size-markings-on-bicycle-tires-mean/
     
    Having been trained in the interpretation of the Rorschach test in psychological testing it took little time for me to realize I had not even a hint at what the hell `erlebnistypus' meant.  I still don't.  
     
    So ... what does `ISO 584 v ISO 571' mean?
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    tojesky
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    Re: Tech Questions Answered 2019/11/16 10:59:21 (permalink)
    Doc Dan
     
    ... 
    So ... what does `ISO 584 v ISO 571' mean?


    My foul-up, it is actually ERTO and is an international standard and in this case for bicycle wheel rim diameter. If you look at your 650c tires, they will most likely have the size molded with 571x23 or something similar. A 700c will be 622x23 where the 23 is the tire width in millimeters.  You cannot mount a 650b tire on a 650c wheel, it will be too big
     
    650b is typically used for mountain bikes but more recently has found favor in gravel bikes.
     
    About a third of the page down on this link is a table that shows the various ISO sizes and the tires that fit.
     
    https://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html
     
     
     
     
    post edited by tojesky - 2019/11/16 11:03:17

    2013 CA2.0 - 700c
    2014 ICE VTX+
    2013 Invacare Force G hand cycle
    2006 Corsa  (Sold July, 2013)
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    Doc Dan
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    Re: Tech Questions Answered 2019/11/16 19:18:19 (permalink)
    Thanks, Tim.  I've been confused (for years) and too lazy to do much about it as it relates to tire sizes.  About four weeks ago I took the advice of an experienced cyclist acquaintance and went with the 28s.  I ordered what he recommended.  It made some mighty gnarly road much smoother.  Today, before a ride, I inspected the sidewalls and came up with: 650 x 28c.  And then, further along the sidewall: 571.  
     
    So I ordered two more of the same when I got home.  
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    Carl in Richland
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    Re: Tech Questions Answered 2019/12/07 11:10:11 (permalink)
    I'd inquired on another thread about installing Rohloff hubs to a Giro 20AT. The motivation is to gain the ability to more easily shift gears when going up some very steep hills in our area. One respondent said he had one on his trike. But there have been no responses for a two-wheeled 'bent. Is adding this well-spoken of hub to a Giro two-wheeler something that's mechanically feasible without exceptional work? Would an alternative hub work just as well (the Rohloff's are hard to find North America)?
    Thanks!
    Carl
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    velo_h
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    Re: Tech Questions Answered 2020/02/28 06:22:31 (permalink)
    Is it possible to mount a light rear luggage carrier like the Tubus Fly to my Baccetta CA3.o? Either to the tube screws (the tube, which support the seat, marked red) and/or with the help of rubber dampened clamps (marked green) to these tubes to the right ad the left? Terra Cycle does not offer a Bacchetta Rack because of "Structural reasons."

    Thanks Herbert
    post edited by velo_h - 2020/02/28 07:04:56

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    velo_h
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    Re: Tech Questions Answered 2020/03/03 01:45:15 (permalink)
    Carl
    I'd inquired on another thread about installing Rohloff hubs to a Giro 20AT. ...Is adding this well-spoken of hub to a Giro two-wheeler something that's mechanically feasible without exceptional work? Would an alternative hub work just as well (the Rohloff's are hard to find North America)?
    Thanks!
    Carl


    To be honest, I'm a Rohloff fan-boy (got an old hub along with a presentation bicycle prety cheap). German quality as it should be, the manual complex, but perfect (for any screw, a torque is indicated) and I like the switching precision (it's fun to switch) a lot. Spare parts are available for decades and at fair prices (contrary to SRAM...) Costumer support is exeptionel: I would send a mail from Switzerland to Rohloff, Germany and within 1-2 hours I would get a call by a competent technician. To swap the switching cable can be a bit tricky (I've got an older version of the switching mechanism). The torque, which is necessary to hold the Rohloff, is quite strong. You should double check with Bacchetta, whether or not the frame would stand the torque. Compared to the weight of a 52/39/30 the rohloff is nearly one pound heavier (about 400g, which means nearly two pounds compared to a 1-12 gear box. In Germany the Rohloff is often used with recumbents, but it should not used with rear cranks (however it is used with HP recumbents, which have rear cranks, quite often. The shimano 11 speed (half the price) would be an alternative, but on the velomobilforum.de quite a lot of the users report of problems with one or two speeds, which are not exactly selected... As an alternative you could go for a derailleur gear 1-12 gear box, either from Shimano or SRAM (the chain line might be a bit of a problem), may be combined to a suntour cassette. The 1-12 SRAM or Shimano can get pretty dear however. If you take into account the replacement of cassette (a SRAM 12 speed cassette is nearly EUR 300), chainring and chain, the price difference isn't that heavy at all. The Rohloff rear chainring can be turned once, if it's worn out, by the way and the Rohloff chain would hardly wear out (no sidewise stress). Once a year the oil has to be replaced on a Rohloff, that's all.
    I see four Rohloff service stations in the US by the way: https://www.rohloff.de/en/company/worldwide
    post edited by velo_h - 2020/03/03 02:35:02
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    velo_h
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    Re: Tech Questions Answered 2020/03/03 01:52:36 (permalink)
    Doc Dan
    `ISO 584 v ISO 571' mean?


    The metric tyre dimensions are absolute dimensions in milimeter (one meter divided by 1000). One meter is a bit more than 3 feet. On a 622mm rim, which is about 2 feet of diameter, a 622 tyre would fit 100%. There are 20 inch tyres in 406 mm, 451 mm (in reality about 22 inch...). That's why it's so handy to use the metric Milimeter dimensions. A 25-622 tyre is 25mm broad and has a diameter of 622mm (24.49 inch)
    post edited by velo_h - 2020/03/03 01:54:44
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