Hot!Do It

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Doc Dan
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2019/09/05 20:54:36 (permalink)

Do It

I thought about writing a lengthy blog post about getting two new fake knees in the last ten months ... and returning to cycling.  But I won't.  So.
 
The first knee job `had' to be done because I could barely walk a block without agonizing pain.  F'get about cycling.  The second knee job (10 months later) could likely have waited a few years, during which I would have aged more and simply deteriorated.  So I just grimaced and got it done right away.  
 
Two metal and plastic knees.  Recovery from surgery and rehabilitation to training and competitive cycling has taken patience and commitment.  
 
It worked.
 
Because I live in the central Arizona mountains I have atypical terrain for recumbent training.  Most recumbent cyclists put up with hills and climbing because we sometimes have little choice.  I have NO choice.  It's climbing or not riding. 
 
I have three events in the next few months.  The first is the Skull Valley Loop Challenge (https://www.svlchallenge.com/).  Short and intense.  4,000 feet of climbing (and descending) over 54 miles.  Then No Country for Old Men (208 mile course).  Twice as `climby' but four times longer than SVLC.  And then in early November the 24 hour World Time Trials in Borrego Springs, California.  The course is not as flat as most folks think.  An 18.1 mile loop with 350 feet of climbing each loop -- almost all of it in a two mile section of the course.  It wears on 'ya.
 
Training.  I don't have any physical problems, now, that keep me from putting everything into it.  The knees are totally painless.  Ligament, tendon and muscle respond to the stress of intense training as they should.  They get fatigued, sore.  But they improve with vigorous, consistent training.  In some respects I'm in better shape than I may have been in ten years.  And improving.  Five days a week.  Climbing my tucas off.  
 
So ... if you have a physical limiter than can be dealt with ... do it"You have nothing to lose but your chains." (Karl Marx).
 
- Dan
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    thecanoe
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    Re: Do It 2019/09/20 19:17:44 (permalink)
    Dan,
    How long after surgery did you wait for that first ride

    Larry

    Ti Aero
    Surly Moonlander fat bike
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    Doc Dan
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    Re: Do It 2019/09/24 19:41:19 (permalink)
    thecanoe
    Dan,
    How long after surgery did you wait for that first ride

    For me, this is a good question.  I didn't want to wait until I felt 75% O.K. before I hit the open road.  So I worked out on the indoor trainer (Lemond Revolution) six days after surgery.  12.3 miles over 2 hours.  Very gentle.  Kept regular indoor work, progressively increasing power and time until early July when I hit the open road. My first two attempts at open road work proved `too soon' and I returned to indoor work.  It wasn't until August 1st that the collateral ligaments in my knee were strong enough to do 14.5 miles on the open road.  From that point on I've been regularly on the open road.  At this point the `knee' isn't in the least an impediment.  Working on my stamina and power now.   
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